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    • Robin

      Welcome!   03/05/2016

      Welcome, everyone, to the new 910CMX Community Forums. I'm still working on getting them running, so things may change.  If you're a 910 Comic creator and need your forum recreated, let me know and I'll get on it right away.  I'll do my best to make this new place as fun as the last one!

ProfessorTomoe

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ProfessorTomoe last won the day on May 13

ProfessorTomoe had the most liked content!

About ProfessorTomoe

  • Rank
    Don't Poke the Lump

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    A Pocket Universe Near Garland, TX
  • Interests
    Music, Open-Wheel and Endurance Racing, good cheese
  1. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    I had two cups of coffee this morning, and my pain medication still managed to knock me out for several hours. Makes me wonder why I bother to drink the stuff at times.
  2. Mother's Day Gift 2019

    My son and I conspired behind his mother's back to commission another webcomic artist (Kittyhawk, http://montrose.is/sketching ) to draw his mother as one of the sailor senshi from Sailor Moon. I've always associated her with Sailor Jupiter because of her kindness and her strength, so we had Kittyhawk try and adapt a 56-year-old woman to a sailor senshi. The results were remarkable. So, I give you my wife's mother's day present: Sailor Brenda, a.k.a. Sailor Scorpio! She's not really that skinny and her legs aren't that long, but hey - artistic license, okay? Anyway, my wife loves it. She's gonna get it printed on slate to match the Kittyhawk drawings of our two cats I had commissioned last year.
  3. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    I need to invest in a good set of steel toes.
  4. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    That is what's called a "Ram's Horn." It's caused by trauma to the nail and the nail bed, according to my doctor. You see, way back when my son was a 3-or-4 year old, he managed to swing his sneaker-shod foot backward so that the sole caught my bare big toe. He tore off the entire toenail in one fell swoop. My toe has never recovered, and I still remember the pain to this day.
  5. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    I'm just waiting for my foot to stop hurting. Take a look at my foot post-op here: https://dleejackson.lbjackson.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/MiddleToe01a.jpg See the single stitch on my foot proper? That's where the doctor cut into my foot and took a bone biopsy. It still hurts there, sometimes more than in my toe.
  6. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    However, once fired, the result would be painful, but quite stylish. It would definitely be a case of haute foot.
  7. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    I wonder what I could do with two bionic toes. Pick up pencils?
  8. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    Well, here's what happened. I had surgery last Friday. He removed two bones of the middle toe of my left foot and did a bone biopsy of the middle metatarsal. Fortunately, the bone biopsy came back negative, so no more surgery (yay!). I'm dealing with a case of hives, though, which popped up on my left shin about a week before my surgery. It was hell when I had to wear a surgical boot on my left foot, but that came off after my follow-up yesterday. I'm on prescription cortisone cream and Valium (to stop the urge to scratch) for the hives, and my foot is just wrapped until my next follow-up, next week.
  9. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    The news keeps getting worse. I had a face-to-face appointment with my foot doctor yesterday. Not only do I have osteomyelitis in the middle toe of my left foot, I've got signs of it in the metatarsal (the long bone) that leads to the middle toe. So, when he does the partial amputation of my toe, he's going to do a bone biopsy of my metatarsal. I'm kinda scared of the possibility of losing part of my foot proper due to a bone infection. How will it affect how I walk?
  10. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    I just got some bad news from my podiatrist's office. I had a bone scan run on the infected middle toe of my left foot on Wednesday. Just got the results a few minutes ago - it's osteomyelitis, a bone infection. The same thing that cost me the second toe of that same foot back in December of 2018. We're not screwing with the IV antibiotics this go-round. They did no good last time, and they'll do no good this time. We're going straight to partial amputation. It's scheduled for some time in the morning of Friday, April 26th.
  11. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    The infection has failed to respond to antibiotics and topical iodine treatments. The subcutaneous fat layer of the tip of my toe is now exposed. The doctor now says my toe looks just like toe #2 did last year. He is scheduling a radioisotope bone scan to determine if I have a bone infection (osteomyelitis), which is what I had in toe #2. If I have osteomyelitis, we're going to skip the six weeks' worth of IV antibiotics that we tried last time (which also didn't work) and proceed directly with a partial amputation. My depression gene is kicking me in the ass over this.
  12. What Are You Ingesting?

    Currently drinking Spiced Purple Maize drink from Aldi. It's a variant on the Peruvian national drink known as Chicha Morada, which is made from boiled purple corn, pineapple, quince, and spices. It takes a glass or two to get used to the unusual taste (along with the fact that you're basically drinking corn), but once you're past the weirdness of it all, you're hooked. The only problem with it is that it's 70 calories per 8 oz. glass - there's no artificial sweetener in it. It's sugar all the way. I've adapted my enjoyment by mixing it with my Crystal Light Lemon Tea, at about half a bottle per gallon of tea. That cuts it down to around 140 calories a day, and it makes it taste even better. Next time you're at Aldi, grab yourself a bottle. Put it in the chill chest for a few hours first. Let it get good and frosty - iced down doesn't cut it. Pour yourself a small glass and take a small sip. Be ready to taste something you've never experienced before. If you can make it through the whole glass, you'll probably be addicted, which will be a good thing for your body according to medical studies. Enjoy.
  13. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    Last year, I had part of the second toe of my left foot amputated due to a bone infection gone out of control. Today, I found out I have an infection of the middle toe of my left foot. The foot doctor says we caught it just in time. He saw no bone problems on the X-rays. However, I am wearing a special walking boot on that foot and will have to take precautions when I shower so that I don't get it wet (I'll have to clean it separately outside of the shower). My foot is a pain in the arse.
  14. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    Thank you. In perspective, it should save me a lot of grief. The pain that the surgery is designed to relieve can be crippling at its worst. It felt like I had a large, jagged rock between my ankle and the flat of my foot.
  15. Changing Medications (Level of Trust Required)

    Surgery No. 2 (Endovenous Ablation, left leg) was done today. It looked at first like it was going to be easier than the right leg was, since they only had to do one lidocaine injection to insert the sheath and the catheter. However, the problems started once they started doing injections farther up the leg. They did about a half dozen injections prior to the radio wave ablation, each one more painful than the last. Things got even worse when they turned on the radio wave machine - I felt an intense pain from inside my leg. They either missed a spot with the lidocaine, or they didn't wait long enough for it to kick in. They gave me more lidocaine and restarted the ablation. A couple more burning spots popped up along the leg during the ablation, requiring even more lidocaine. In total, I think they hit me with about 10-12 injections when all was said and done. About seven hours later, I am very sore. Walking hurts. Sitting hurts. I'm worn out.