• Announcements

    • Robin

      Welcome!   03/05/2016

      Welcome, everyone, to the new 910CMX Community Forums. I'm still working on getting them running, so things may change.  If you're a 910 Comic creator and need your forum recreated, let me know and I'll get on it right away.  I'll do my best to make this new place as fun as the last one!
CritterKeeper

What Are You Watching?

329 posts in this topic

The Indycar Grand Prix of St. Petersburg. Will Power just got a drive-through penalty for running over his air hose and tire changing gun on the way out of a pit stop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Test Match Cricket, live on WillowHD. India v Australia. Day 3, Session 3. India trail by 131 runs with 320-5.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been watching a Downton Abbey marathon on PBS, interrupted as necessary by work and sleep.

They just showed the episode where Sybil died.  (It's been years, I think I'm allowed to discuss that much!)  It inspired me to look up what I'd have used to treat seizures, and see what was available back then.  The episode is set in 1920, and the most effective treatment for severe seizure, IV diazepam, wasn't released until 1963!  The other standard for seizures, phenobarbital, was on the market by 1912, but it was only known as a sedative, not an anti-seizure medication.  The doctor who discovered its anti-seizure properties was, unfortunately, a Jewish doctor in Germany (he eventually went from University Chair to Dachau concentration camp before escaping to America) and the journal he published his findings in was in German; World War I disrupted communication and further slowed the spread of this life-saving information.

Apparently about all they would have had for seizures at that time would have been bromide, which has a lot of side effects, or paraldehyde, which has been used for seizures since 1882 and is still used, in some circumstances, to this day, or magnesium sulfate, which I'm not really familiar with but was apparently at least known in that era, but one source says it was another decade before it saw routine use for eclampsia.  I can only assume that if Sybil had been taken to the hospital, such drugs would have been an option, but the fact that she gave birth at home would limit them to whatever the doctors had in their bags.

The death scene also reminded me of when a coworker had grand mal seizure at work, with strong enough muscle contractions that her diaphragm couldn't move properly and she wasn't breathing for a short time.  (People use to think epileptics stopped breathing from swallowing their tongue or the like, but that's just not true and messing with someone's mouth at a time like that is a good way to get your fingers bitten.)   My friend's breathing resumed as her seizure eased, but I can really appreciate how well they portrayed Sybil's unrelenting seizure and the way she basically suffocated to death from it!

It does seem that they should have shown more concern for Mary when she was pregnant, as one of the major risk factors for eclampsia is having a close relative, like a sister, who's had it.  It should have frightened everyone, especially Mary and her husband!

 

Getting off the medical tragedy, it's been fun seeing some of the early episodes, especially the first couple last night.  I've caught the odd episode frequently and have seen a few several times, but I don't think I've seen the first few since my first viewing.  It's also wonderful to see so many strong women characters, something TV and movies are still so sadly short of most times, and the writing is excellent.  :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aussie Rules Football again. North Melbourne is leading West Coast Eagles 30 to 21 at the end of the first quarter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now