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ChronosCat

Sketchbook Aug 28, 2018 - Happy Casual Felix

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Posted (edited)

https://egscomics.com/sketchbook/2018-016

Another older Patreon post making it's way into the Sketchbook.

I like her blue hair & fur. (Blue is the best color for fur! At lest for us cat-people that don't need camouflage.)

It struck me reading the commentary that Felix is referred to as "she". I had forgotten Felix was trans in her birth form (or so Pandora says; thank you Shiveapedia).

Edited by ChronosCat
Confirmed Felix's gender.

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22 minutes ago, ChronosCat said:

https://egscomics.com/sketchbook/2018-016

Another older Patreon post making it's way into the Sketchbook.

The divisions of what ended up on Sketchbook and what didn't always seemed arbitrary to me. The possibility Dan just forget is believable.

... as long as Dan is reviewing sketchbooks, maybe he will fill the missing commentaries?

24 minutes ago, ChronosCat said:

I like her blue hair & fur.

It definitely looks good on her. However, it's not that much fur - she only has hair and tail, and we can see that pretty clearly.

 

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Blue is such an underused colour for hair in the mammals of what we call the real world.

Birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, insects, flowers, algae, fungi, and comedians have no problem going blue.

Why should the only place I see blue hair be on the heads of older human women?

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42 minutes ago, Pharaoh RutinTutin said:

Blue is such an underused colour for hair in the mammals of what we call the real world.

Birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, insects, flowers, algae, fungi, and comedians have no problem going blue.

Why should the only place I see blue hair be on the heads of older human women?

Quick google suggests it's because there is no blue pigment in any terrestrial vertebrate (probably because lot of chemicals which would work as blue pigment are poisonous or require very copper-rich diet to produce). Mammals, especially their hair, are colored by pigments, and limited to brown-black and reddish-yellow. Birds and amphibians are cheating and use microscopic structures in feathers or skin to selectively scatter light and appear blue.

Here some example of green pigments including explanation why it's rare.

And of course list of blue pigments. Note that cobalt is generally bad idea, not counting B12.

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9 hours ago, hkmaly said:

Quick google suggests it's because there is no blue pigment in any terrestrial vertebrate

Quick duckduckgo says

?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftse3.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3
WHAT AM I, CHOPPED LIVER? (hey, can I have some?)

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11 hours ago, Stature said:

The sky is blue, the water not always.

Really?

6 hours ago, Don Edwards said:
16 hours ago, hkmaly said:

Quick google suggests it's because there is no blue pigment in any terrestrial vertebrate

Quick duckduckgo says

?u=https%3A%2F%2Ftse3.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3
WHAT AM I, CHOPPED LIVER? (hey, can I have some?)

Considering color of Lygodactylus williamsi varies with it's mood and temperature, and also looking on how bright it is, I would assume this is one of those cases when it's not blue pigment but microscopic structures in skin to selectively scatter light. Meaning, it will stop being blue if you would be so cruel to grind it.

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27 minutes ago, Pharaoh RutinTutin said:

So it isn't actually blue
It just looks blue?

Can be said that way, although I rather said it's not blue pigment which seems clearer.

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1 hour ago, CritterKeeper said:

There are non-toxic blues, like YInMn Blue -- we, or nature, would just have to develop a way to create the compound wihin the body.  ;-)

From what? While YInMn itself is non-toxic (probably due to being extremely stable with that being prepared at 1,093 °C) lot of yttrium compouds are toxic, Indium oxides are toxic and manganese overexposure leads to neurological disorder ...

... waaait, that can actually work. Imagine mammal species which is able to create this pigment as a way to detoxicate it's body and save itself from those toxic compounds.

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53 minutes ago, hkmaly said:

From what? While YInMn itself is non-toxic (probably due to being extremely stable with that being prepared at 1,093 °C) lot of yttrium compouds are toxic, Indium oxides are toxic and manganese overexposure leads to neurological disorder ...

Hence the wink.  :-)

53 minutes ago, hkmaly said:

... waaait, that can actually work. Imagine mammal species which is able to create this pigment as a way to detoxicate [its] body and save itself from those toxic compounds.

Now you're getting into the spirit!!

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So all we need to do is

  1. Consume a handful of highly toxic chemicals and
  2. Run a fever equivalent to about one fifth the temperature of the Sun's surface

Then we could have blue skin and/or hair?

Do we have some one working on this?

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2 hours ago, Pharaoh RutinTutin said:

So all we need to do is

  1. Consume a handful of highly toxic chemicals and
  2. Run a fever equivalent to about one fifth the temperature of the Sun's surface

Then we could have blue skin and/or hair?

Do we have some one working on this?

Just because it needs 1,093 °C in laboratory doesn't mean it needs as much in body. Remember that alcohol generally burns at 1,920 °C, yet our body is able to oxidise it without any significant temperature change. Instead of relying on random collisions at high temperatures, we will have enzymes grabbing the components and then smacking them together at correct angle. It would still consume the same amount of ENERGY, but without raising the temperature.

Now, creating those enzymes would be challenge. Then we need to program them into DNA. But hey, blue hair!

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6 hours ago, hkmaly said:

From what? While YInMn itself is non-toxic (probably due to being extremely stable with that being prepared at 1,093 °C) lot of yttrium compouds are toxic, Indium oxides are toxic and manganese overexposure leads to neurological disorder ...

... waaait, that can actually work. Imagine mammal species which is able to create this pigment as a way to detoxicate it's body and save itself from those toxic compounds.

Noted for games...

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