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Pharaoh RutinTutin

Story Friday August 16, 2019

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2e11tPlNLnc

If I remember, the Putt-Putt company made their brand name so synonymous with miniature golf that many people would refer to any miniature golf as putt-putt, even if a given course wasn't a Putt-Putt franchise.

This led to a lot of litigation that only served to drain the fun out of miniature golf.

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51 minutes ago, Pharaoh RutinTutin said:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2e11tPlNLnc

If I remember, the Putt-Putt company made their brand name so synonymous with miniature golf that many people would refer to any miniature golf as putt-putt, even if a given course wasn't a Putt-Putt franchise.

This led to a lot of litigation that only served to drain the fun out of miniature golf.

Oh. Xerox might comment about this.

5 hours ago, Scotty said:

Was it the same Putt-Putt that tried suing Mojang because a player created a custom map named Putt-Putt in Minecraft?

Interesting.

(BTW, how can any web developer think that if he displays big overlay complaining about blocking ads it will help? Removing the overlay is EASIER than "enabling" the ads, especially considering I already see the ads there suggesting the detection process is buggy.)

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1 hour ago, The Old Hack said:
3 hours ago, hkmaly said:

Load of nonsense. After all, IBM themselves said that some stupid device for making copies of written material would never be of any use in office work. :danshiftyeyes:

Was Robert Lloyd involved in that statement? The engineer of the Advanced Computing Systems Division of IBM who said "What the hell is it good for?" in 1968 when his colleague insisted that microprocessor was the wave of the future?

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1 minute ago, hkmaly said:

Was Robert Lloyd involved in that statement? The engineer of the Advanced Computing Systems Division of IBM who said "What the hell is it good for?" in 1968 when his colleague insisted that microprocessor was the wave of the future?

I really don't know. All I know is that 640K ought to be enough for anyone.

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640k was indeed enough for anyone--anyone who was running the models of IBM PC that existed at the time that this statement was made. Those were still the days in which a computer operating system was designed around a specific hardware program (e.g. the System 360 series of mainframes had their own OS). It was more or less assumed that by the time the hardware limits became a problem, a new OS would have superseded DOS.

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26 minutes ago, ijuin said:

640k was indeed enough for anyone--anyone who was running the models of IBM PC that existed at the time that this statement was made. Those were still the days in which a computer operating system was designed around a specific hardware program (e.g. the System 360 series of mainframes had their own OS). It was more or less assumed that by the time the hardware limits became a problem, a new OS would have superseded DOS.

It was. OS/2 started to be developed in 1985 and first version was released in 1987. Never gained track. Also, compared to 80286 being introduced in 1984 it was sort of too late. And, 80286 already contained hacks specifically to allow older software to work (like A20 gate). It shouldn't. 640k might've been enough for anyone running 8086 or 80186, but NOT 80286, yet the limit still mattered even MUCH later on even newer CPUs.

Also, that statement was possibly never made, so it's hard to analyze it's context.

 

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3 hours ago, hkmaly said:

It shouldn't. 640k might've been enough for anyone running 8086 or 80186, but NOT 80286, yet the limit still mattered even MUCH later on even newer CPUs.

Yeah, even on a 80486 with 8mb of RAM the *.exe filesize could not exceed 640k and with drivers for mouse, CDrom, sound, etc also needing part of that 640k, being able to manipulate the config.sys and autoexec.bat files were necessary.

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2 hours ago, Scotty said:

Yeah, even on a 80486 with 8mb of RAM the *.exe filesize could not exceed 640k and with drivers for mouse, CDrom, sound, etc also needing part of that 640k, being able to manipulate the config.sys and autoexec.bat files were necessary.

Ah, not true.  The programmer just had to use the DOS/16M library and not do any thing stupid with malloced memory.

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1 hour ago, mlooney said:

Ah, not true.  The programmer just had to use the DOS/16M library and not do any thing stupid with malloced memory.

If the programmer was human, eventually something stupid would be done.

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5 hours ago, mlooney said:

Ah, not true.  The programmer just had to use the DOS/16M library and not do any thing stupid with malloced memory.

 

4 hours ago, Pharaoh RutinTutin said:

If the programmer was human, eventually something stupid would be done.

Yeah if you do the normal bad and stupid thing with malloced memory it will auto crash, not hang the system.  If running the debug version it will drop your editor, assuming you have it set up right, on the line of code that triggered the Int D.

 

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18 hours ago, Scotty said:
21 hours ago, hkmaly said:

It shouldn't. 640k might've been enough for anyone running 8086 or 80186, but NOT 80286, yet the limit still mattered even MUCH later on even newer CPUs.

Yeah, even on a 80486 with 8mb of RAM the *.exe filesize could not exceed 640k and with drivers for mouse, CDrom, sound, etc also needing part of that 640k, being able to manipulate the config.sys and autoexec.bat files were necessary.

Authors of DOS extenders like QEMM386 did great job of making as much memory available as possible. However ... they shouldn't need to. Such stuff is OS's responsibility but DOS failed so seriously in this regard that programs hacking DOS while running did better job ...

9 hours ago, mlooney said:
15 hours ago, mlooney said:

Ah, not true.  The programmer just had to use the DOS/16M library and not do any thing stupid with malloced memory.

14 hours ago, Pharaoh RutinTutin said:

If the programmer was human, eventually something stupid would be done.

Yeah if you do the normal bad and stupid thing with malloced memory it will auto crash, not hang the system.  If running the debug version it will drop your editor, assuming you have it set up right, on the line of code that triggered the Int D.

Ah, the wonders of programming on system where your program - or the debugger - has complete control of the computer and OS is just a library you may or may not use ... and need to be careful to not damage by mistake ...

 

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7 minutes ago, hkmaly said:

Authors of DOS extenders like QEMM386 did great job of making as much memory available as possible. However ... they shouldn't need to.

Good God, I remember the days where we used these. :icon_eek:

I can't say I miss them.

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26 minutes ago, The Old Hack said:
34 minutes ago, hkmaly said:

Authors of DOS extenders like QEMM386 did great job of making as much memory available as possible. However ... they shouldn't need to.

Good God, I remember the days where we used these. :icon_eek:

I can't say I miss them.

I remember trying to enhance QEMM. Like, creating a resident program running in protected mode. It was lot of fun. It also didn't really do anything useful which wouldn't be possible with regular resident program ...

Then I found linux.

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