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mlooney

Comic for Wednesday, May 25, 2022

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Here is.
So Edward's squinting was due to needing glasses.

Also Uryuoms are forbidden technology for what may or may not be good reasons.  This may explain why the TF gun was illegal to sell on their "world" as it was forbidden tech.

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Dwight sums it up. "I had no idea ...", "... yet I felt justified in flying off the handle, rather than sorting out the facts."

 

In Dwight's defense, much stupidity is based on fear.

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The looks of surprise of Edward when Dwight says Uryuoms almost took over the world makes me wonder how much contact the Uryuoms on "our" side of the world have with the Uryuoms on the griffin side of the world.

 

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Oooh.  Hand't thought about that.  That being said, I think there is a major difference between the "our side" Uryuoms and the griffin side Uryuoms in terms of being in the open and attempting to take control.  If Lavender was part of a plot to take control of the government she wouldn't be an administrative assistant, she would be at least an agent.

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The Uryuom takeover attempt may be related to the magic-based takeover attempt shown in the flashback from the golem. Perhaps once they got locked out of Magic on the EGS side, they turned to pure non-magical tech?

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1 hour ago, mlooney said:

If Lavender was part of a plot to take control of the government she wouldn't be an administrative assistant, she would be at least an agent.

A friend of mine is fond of talking about "B-movie scenarios," meaning schemes that probably would only work out in bad movies. One of these is the idea of "sleeper agents" who maintain their cover for years, arranging to get placed in situations where they can gather intelligence, commit sabotage, or otherwise discomfit the other side.  Whether Lavender is such an agent or not, the thought has to cross Edward's mind.

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So Edward's glasses, unlike Tedd's, are primarily for the traditional function

And so far, every Uryuom we have met on "our" side of the world has seemed mostly harmless. 

I am wondering just how far back this tech ban goes.  And how is it related to the magic ban, which was undone in the not-change.

If Uryuoms have a significant and open population on the Griffon's side, I am wondering what kind of tech exists among those who are neither Uryuom nor magic using.  Are they living in a perpetual Renaissance Fair?  To some degree aware that a world of tech is accessible, but pretending it does not exist because small-pox and serfdom are so much fun.

2 hours ago, mlooney said:

If Lavender was part of a plot to take control of the government . . . .

She and her compatriots should get down to business

They couldn't be any worse than the humans nominally in charge now

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3 hours ago, Pharaoh RutinTutin said:

So Edward's glasses, unlike Tedd's, are primarily for the traditional function

And so far, every Uryuom we have met on "our" side of the world has seemed mostly harmless. 

I am wondering just how far back this tech ban goes.  And how is it related to the magic ban, which was undone in the not-change.

If Uryuoms have a significant and open population on the Griffon's side, I am wondering what kind of tech exists among those who are neither Uryuom nor magic using.  Are they living in a perpetual Renaissance Fair?  To some degree aware that a world of tech is accessible, but pretending it does not exist because small-pox and serfdom are so much fun.

She and her compatriots should get down to business

They couldn't be any worse than the humans nominally in charge now

The bacteria are in charge They make all the really important decisions, like the gaseous composition of the atmosphere. You might say, "Except for farts" (flatus, if you prefer). Ah, but where do you think the gas in those farts come from? The bacteria are in control.

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9 hours ago, Amiable Dorsai said:

The look of surprise on Edward's face makes me wonder how or if this new information will affect his relationship with Lavender.

I highly doubt every Uryuom on the other side, let alone every one (if any at all) on the main cast's side, participated in this attempted conquest. Edward rejecting Lavender because of this would be like someone rejecting an American of German descent because a certain German and his followers tried to take over the world that one time...

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15 hours ago, Darth Fluffy said:

The bacteria are in control.

With beetles being the loyal opposition.

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14 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

I highly doubt every Uryuom on the other side, let alone every one (if any at all) on the main cast's side, participated in this attempted conquest.

So do I. The only attempt we know about on our side of the world coincided with the collapse of the Bronze Age. But Edward's whole career is based around looking for security threats; this has to have him thinking.

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17 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

I highly doubt every Uryuom on the other side, let alone every one (if any at all) on the main cast's side, participated in this attempted conquest. Edward rejecting Lavender because of this would be like someone rejecting an American of German descent because a certain German and his followers tried to take over the world that one time...

It could be even more extreme than that - it could be like rejecting an American of Anglo-Saxon descent because the Angles and Saxons were Germanic tribes and, a few centuries after they left for Britain, that German and his followers tried to take over the world.

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37 minutes ago, Amiable Dorsai said:

In my head canon, Uryuoms are the Sea People who precipitated the fall of the Mediterranean civilization.

Possible, but Edward doesn't think so.

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2 minutes ago, Pharaoh RutinTutin said:

As opposed to the C people.  The kids in school who did the absolute minimum to pass.

As opposed to C programmers, who did a lot more than the absolute minimum.   BASIC programmers did the minimum generally

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On 5/27/2022 at 10:24 AM, mlooney said:

As opposed to C programmers, who did a lot more than the absolute minimum.   BASIC programmers did the minimum generally

I resemble that remark. 'BASIC' is ill named. It was originally modeled on being a simplified abstract assembler, did everything FORTRAN did, in the case of line formatting, did it less obtrusively. I learned FORTRAN first, and BASIC was a breath of fresh air, in that you did not have to keep nearly as sharp an eye out for syntactic quirks. Also bear in mind, it was originally designed to teach introductory programming in an academic environment.

C has distinct advantages, and many pitfalls. It was designed side by side with UNIX, and many of it's strengths relate directly to it's I/O with the operating system. Many of it's strengths are also weaknesses and security holes, pointers I'm looking at you.

A key difference is that for a generalized procedural language, BASIC is in a minority that are primarily interpreted. This was more significant back in the day. In any case, it is not a hard and fast rule. You can get compilers for many interpreted languages, and interpreters for many compiled languages. I tend to prefer interpreted a.k.a. 'late binding' as being more portable, that's why browsers like interpreted languages, but either is usable.

Microsoft Basics and similar Basics have advanced BASIC far beyond the original language. The string handling is top notch, handling hardware is addressed, data and control structures are available, I/O to the OS is added since the move to 16 bit and DOS.

A key point is clarity. Using Pascal as the gold standard, you can write clear code in Basic (you can also through mud in if you jump all over the place). You can do the same in C, but there is an obfuscated C code competition for a reason. The macro feature does not help clarity. It can, but mostly it is a layer of fog. (And some macros look logical and just don't work.) Maybe it's the C culture, but C code is rarely straight up readable.

Industry evidence? In the late 1970s, every instrument maker's desktop workstation ran native Basic code.

 

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35 minutes ago, Darth Fluffy said:

'BASIC' is ill named.

Beginners' All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code.  Seem correctly named for me.  

 

38 minutes ago, Darth Fluffy said:

A key point is clarity. Using Pascal as the gold standard, you can write clear code in Basic (you can also through mud in if you jump all over the place). You can do the same in C, but there is an obfuscated C code competition for a reason.

Someone that started programming in Pascal coding in C will result in pretty readable code.  At least that's what I tell my self.  When I was programming for a living I had some pretty strong layout and coding standards.  Plus every thing had to pass `lint` before it went into the code base.

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On 5/29/2022 at 5:52 PM, mlooney said:

Beginners' All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code.  Seem correctly named for me. 

What per cent of the people who use Basic (notice, Basic, not BASIC. No one uses the original any more.) know that is is an acronym? The original was for an introductory programing course. I imagine it served well. Modern basic is way beyond it's roots, as are most languages.

One of my early jobs was coding in Basic (very extended) on a scientific work station. It has huge (for the era) floating point numbers, high precision. The purpose was data visualization, and highlighting events in the frequency domain.

 

On 5/29/2022 at 5:52 PM, mlooney said:

Someone that started programming in Pascal coding in C will result in pretty readable code.  At least that's what I tell my self.  When I was programming for a living I had some pretty strong layout and coding standards.  Plus every thing had to pass `lint` before it went into the code base.

Yes, I'd agree, someone motivated to do so can produce clean code in just about any language.

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7 hours ago, Darth Fluffy said:

The original was for an introductory programing course. I imagine it served well.

Dartmouth BASIC was weird.  Of course had Mr. Gates not written a BASIC  interpreter we would have had a structured version of it as the default standard.  According to Wikipedia the original idea for BASIC was for the whole of the school, not just the STEM students to have access to a computer and do work in close to real time.

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9 hours ago, Darth Fluffy said:

someone motivated to do so can produce clean code in just about any language.

Are you suggesting that a significant portion of programming language problems stem from apathy or laziness on the part of the programmers?

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