• Announcements

    • Robin

      Welcome!   03/05/2016

      Welcome, everyone, to the new 910CMX Community Forums. I'm still working on getting them running, so things may change.  If you're a 910 Comic creator and need your forum recreated, let me know and I'll get on it right away.  I'll do my best to make this new place as fun as the last one!
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Stature

NP Wednesday March 15, 2017

41 posts in this topic

Sugar burns, but burning solid sugar in air leaves a LOT of solid carbon residue, making it unsuitable for internal combustion type engines--you would need external combustion (e.g. steam), or some kind of catalytic fuel cell that breaks it down in a non-combustion manner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, ijuin said:

Sugar burns, but burning solid sugar in air leaves a LOT of solid carbon residue, making it unsuitable for internal combustion type engines--you would need external combustion (e.g. steam), or some kind of catalytic fuel cell that breaks it down in a non-combustion manner.

I think that you might get acceptable results with high levels of oxygen. Considering sugar can explode ... but only when NOT wet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sugar explodes, but that says nothing about the residue that it leaves behind. In an internal combustion engine it will gum up the pistons or turbine, which is why they used to put sugar in gasoline tanks to sabotage automotive or aircraft engines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ijuin said:

Sugar explodes, but that says nothing about the residue that it leaves behind. In an internal combustion engine it will gum up the pistons or turbine, which is why they used to put sugar in gasoline tanks to sabotage automotive or aircraft engines.

Hmmmm ... true, I vaguely remember something like that (maybe Biggles did it?).

Still, just because piston internal combustion engine is bad for burning it doesn't mean you need external combustion. It may work fine in jet engine, for example. (Not sure how can you power robots with jet engines, though.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, hkmaly said:

Not sure how can you power robots with jet engines, though.

I'm sure that Grant Imahara would find a way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, hkmaly said:

Not sure how can you power robots with jet engines, though

Ask the Deceptcions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, hkmaly said:

Hmmmm ... true, I vaguely remember something like that (maybe Biggles did it?).

It was one of these things that happened in occupied Denmark during WW2, giving German vehicles a little sugar rush. They even encouraged children to do it. I would be astounded if this did not also happen in other occupied countries.

Drasvin likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, The Old Hack said:

It was one of these things that happened in occupied Denmark during WW2, giving German vehicles a little sugar rush. They even encouraged children to do it. I would be astounded if this did not also happen in other occupied countries.

And this is one of the many reasons to have locking gas caps on your vehicles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, The Old Hack said:
20 hours ago, hkmaly said:

Hmmmm ... true, I vaguely remember something like that (maybe Biggles did it?).

It was one of these things that happened in occupied Denmark during WW2, giving German vehicles a little sugar rush. They even encouraged children to do it. I would be astounded if this did not also happen in other occupied countries.

Not sure about you, but I do NOT remember WW2. If I actually remember it related to war (and it's not false memory created by association with the word "sabotage"), it's probably from some book about war ... and I did read multiple books about Biggles.

8 hours ago, Drasvin said:

And this is one of the many reasons to have locking gas caps on your vehicles

Not sure if locking gas caps weren't developed only AFTER the war and exactly for this reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, hkmaly said:

Not sure about you, but I do NOT remember WW2. If I actually remember it related to war (and it's not false memory created by association with the word "sabotage"), it's probably from some book about war ... and I did read multiple books about Biggles.

Not sure if locking gas caps weren't developed only AFTER the war and exactly for this reason.

There might have been another good reason. Gasoline shortages, and they certainly had these during WW2. If you have no gas for your own car it becomes REALLY tempting to, shall we say, 'borrow' some from a car that does have some. I suspect that it would very swiftly grow really old to leave your car with a nearly full tank and then upon returning to it find that more than half its gas was mysteriously gone...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Locking gas caps became popular in the US during the oil embargo of the 1970s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, The Old Hack said:
4 hours ago, hkmaly said:

Not sure about you, but I do NOT remember WW2. If I actually remember it related to war (and it's not false memory created by association with the word "sabotage"), it's probably from some book about war ... and I did read multiple books about Biggles.

Not sure if locking gas caps weren't developed only AFTER the war and exactly for this reason.

There might have been another good reason. Gasoline shortages, and they certainly had these during WW2. If you have no gas for your own car it becomes REALLY tempting to, shall we say, 'borrow' some from a car that does have some. I suspect that it would very swiftly grow really old to leave your car with a nearly full tank and then upon returning to it find that more than half its gas was mysteriously gone...

What so mysterious about it? You only need like half meter long tube, petrol can and not throw up too much from taste of gasoline. Capillary action is pretty well recognizable from magic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, hkmaly said:

What so mysterious about it? You only need like half meter long tube, petrol can and not throw up too much from taste of gasoline. Capillary action is pretty well recognizable from magic.

Ah, my mistake. The 'mysteriously' bit was supposed to be humorous; perhaps I should have put it in quotation marks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, The Old Hack said:
10 minutes ago, hkmaly said:

What so mysterious about it? You only need like half meter long tube, petrol can and not throw up too much from taste of gasoline. Capillary action is pretty well recognizable from magic.

Ah, my mistake. The 'mysteriously' bit was supposed to be humorous; perhaps I should have put it in quotation marks.

No, my mistake, I though it would be funny to pretend I didn't get it. I guess I overdid it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, hkmaly said:
18 minutes ago, The Old Hack said:
20 minutes ago, hkmaly said:

What so mysterious about it? You only need like half meter long tube, petrol can and not throw up too much from taste of gasoline. Capillary action is pretty well recognizable from magic.

Ah, my mistake. The 'mysteriously' bit was supposed to be humorous; perhaps I should have put it in quotation marks.

No, my mistake, I though it would be funny to pretend I didn't get it. I guess I overdid it.

To take from the commentary of a recent story comic, this conflict could have been averted with the proper use of ";)"

 

;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Pharaoh RutinTutin said:

Locking gas caps became popular in the US during the oil embargo of the 1970s.

I had a locking cap on the 1970 Ford Maverick that I was forced to drive in high school. It was my step-mother's car, and like her, it was a piece of junk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0