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      Welcome!   03/05/2016

      Welcome, everyone, to the new 910CMX Community Forums. I'm still working on getting them running, so things may change.  If you're a 910 Comic creator and need your forum recreated, let me know and I'll get on it right away.  I'll do my best to make this new place as fun as the last one!

132 posts in this topic

Holy crap, there's a grammar thread and I never knew? I really should pop into the off-topic forum more often. Forgive me if I travel back in time a bit.

 

On 7/21/2016 at 0:07 AM, HarJIT said:

Also bend→bent, wend→went.  Wend means the same as go, "went" apparently later became more associated with "go".  Otherwise "go" follows (although not exactly phonetically, by current phonetics at any rate) more or less the same conjugation as "do": do/does/done/doing/did, go/goes/gone/going and one would expect "gid" if the two verbs had developed the same.

 

What's really fun about that is that "wend" still exists, and its past tense form has become the regularized "wended".

I wanted to quote the Weird Al Word Crimes video too, but it's on a different page and the quoting function on this forum doesn't lend itself well to copy and paste. In any case, that song has been my personal anthem since it came out.

One last thing. Fun fact: there is no syntactic or semantic difference between "toward" and "towards". It's simply a matter of personal preference.


 

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8 minutes ago, Illjwamh said:

One last thing. Fun fact: there is no syntactic or semantic difference between "toward" and "towards". It's simply a matter of personal preference.

From what I've learned on Scribophile.com, "toward" is the American usage, while "towards" is the British usage. Could be wrong.

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I've literally heard it both that way and the other way around. The truth is that no one knows, so they pretend they know, because there just has to be a difference, doesn't there? After all, why would we have two nearly-identical words that mean the exact same thing if not for regional dialectical variation?

Because English is weird, that's why.

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21 minutes ago, Illjwamh said:

Because English is weird, that's why.

Of course. As Eddie Izzard said, "They do say Britain and America are two countries separated by the Atlantic Ocean ..."

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3 hours ago, ProfessorTomoe said:

Of course. As Eddie Izzard said, "They do say Britain and America are two countries separated by the Atlantic Ocean ..."

It's also been said that Britain and America are two countries divided by a common language...

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