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      Welcome!   03/05/2016

      Welcome, everyone, to the new 910CMX Community Forums. I'm still working on getting them running, so things may change.  If you're a 910 Comic creator and need your forum recreated, let me know and I'll get on it right away.  I'll do my best to make this new place as fun as the last one!
mlooney

Comic for Wednesday, Apr 27, 2022

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Here is.
If I were the type of person that assigned "alternate universe versions" of characters, I would be all over "Cockatoo griffin is alternate form of Male Nanase".  But I'm not, so I'm not.  Sometimes a similar hair do is just similar, with out needing any deeper meaning.  All that aside, why is Liam smirking in the cut out in the last panel?

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Just what is a Snuffeluppagus anyway? My best guess is that they’re supposed to be some sort of wooly mammoth.

Anyway, it seems that Liam is familiar with Andrea. That lends support to the idea that Liam and Tara are both members of some elite unit of mage-griffin knights.

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11 minutes ago, Amiable Dorsai said:

Liam's smirk worries me. I hope he's just happy that he gets to tell off a guard.

I'm fairly sure, given his "I will reprimand as necessary" statement his a high ranking member of the guard.

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2 hours ago, ijuin said:

Just what is a Snuffeluppagus anyway?

Oscar's been dealing some of that funny bird seed out of his can, hasn't he? We've been wondering how he makes his rent payments.

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Next time, can we arrange for a portal and rendezvous location that is out in the open, in broad daylight, with easily identifiable landmarks?

And here he comes to save the day, almost.  The valiant hero who arrives after the fighting is over.

4 hours ago, ijuin said:

Just what is a Snuffeluppagus anyway?

I think is what you see if you land on your head falling down stairs while carrying deserts about ten times

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LShUR4baH4A

 

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5 hours ago, Pharaoh RutinTutin said:

Next time, can we arrange for a portal and rendezvous location that is out in the open, in broad daylight, with easily identifiable landmarks?

DGB would have a litter of kittens if they did that.  Magic might be a known element now, but I'm not sure how they would deal with griffins in public.  Granted Tara has been seen in a mall.

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On 4/27/2022 at 9:08 AM, ijuin said:

Just what is a Snuffeluppagus anyway? My best guess is that they’re supposed to be some sort of wooly mammoth.

When I first started watching Sesame Street, I'm pretty sure I just figured "furry elephant" without questioning it. A bit later (at around age five or so), I started learning about prehistoric animals, and immediately concluded Snuffy was a tusk-less woolly mammoth.

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6 minutes ago, ChronosCat said:

When I first started watching Sesame Street, I'm pretty sure I just figured "furry elephant" without questioning it. A bit later (at around age five or so), I started learning about prehistoric animals, and immediately concluded Snuffy was a tusk-less woolly mammoth.

That’s about what I thought as well. 

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I sorta miss not being the right age for Sesame  Street when it started out.  I remember "The Electric Company" when It came out as being designed for my age group, but I don't really remember watching it.  Of course when I was in Germany on my first tour there was a betting pool as to what the "sponsored by the letter" letter of the day was.  Of course  in that unit there was a betting pool for damn near everything. 

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6 hours ago, mlooney said:

I sorta miss not being the right age for Sesame  Street when it started out.  I remember "The Electric Company" when It came out as being designed for my age group, but I don't really remember watching it.  Of course when I was in Germany on my first tour there was a betting pool as to what the "sponsored by the letter" letter of the day was.  Of course  in that unit there was a betting pool for damn near everything. 

I missed all of that. I remember Capt. Kangaroo, Bozo the Clown, Gene London, Sally Starr, and Chief Halftown; the last three were Philly area hosts. Oh, yes, and Wee Willy Webber when Philly got an independent UHF mega-station. None of them were primarily educational, but could, for the most part, be counted on for having something to say about values on each show. I also watched American Bandstand with Dick Clark, because 'nothing else was on', which probably meant soaps, and why wasn't I outside, playing?

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I watched Captain Kangaroo. 

I was quite surprised to learn that the Uncle Zeb, the channel 8 after school show lasted until 1979.   

The cartoon artist and character I remember most from my childhood was the weather man, Don Woods, and his cartoon "Gusty".  Don made, on the air, a drawing of Gusty having something to the current weather or time of year.  If Gusty said there was a danger from a storm you knew that there was a danger!  Don came to my grade school and did some drawings of Gusty dealing with what you should do if there is tornado.  

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10 hours ago, mlooney said:

I watched Captain Kangaroo. 

On a black and white TV back in the sixties. I caught a bit of it later on a color television and was startled to learn that Mr. Greenjeans wore jeans that were green!

 

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The TV in the kids part of the house was black and white. I have no idea if Captain Kangaroo was in color when I was watching it.

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4 hours ago, Amiable Dorsai said:

On a black and white TV back in the sixties. I caught a bit of it later on a color television and was startled to learn that Mr. Greenjeans wore jeans that were green!

Color TV were expensive a quirky. Moving them could screw up the color, but they were huge and heavy, so moving them was not much of a thing anyway. We did not have one for many years; I recall visiting some friends of my dad regularly to watch Disney in color on Sunday evenings. That's another thing, it took a long time for the shows to buy into color, it was more expensive to produce, and since few people had color receivers, the market was not huge; the whole thing grew incrementally. Disney was a forerunner, but was black and white for many years, even changed the name of the show to highlight the change; Wonderful World of Disney became Wonderful World of Color (a name that makes little sense today). Color TV started in the early 60s and did not become mainstream until the late 60s, but not long afterward, B&W TV sales took a nosedive. For a few years you could still find B&W portables.

Film and movies transitioned earlier, but went through a similar process. In the early 60s, many movies were still being released as B&W (some have since been colorized, a topic with its own content of drama). 

Computer interaction has gone through not just color transition, but resolution, having graphics or not, various underlying standards, even having a monitor or not. The first interactive terminal I used was a time shared teletype, we had a bank for four available. After submitting punch card jobs and waiting for a printout, finding an interactive teletype terminal was incredibly liberating. It only interfaced to BASIC, but you could store your programs on paper tape! Woot! (a term on in use at the time) Remember CGA? Proof that graphics could be crappy if you started from "Business people don't need graphics". Ah, IBM, will you ever remove your cranium  from your derriere?

Resolution technology has affected all media; the old shows look odd today if you see them in their original format.

On the horizon, still, is 3-D technology. 3-D has been around since the 1950s, probably in small doses before that. But it has yet to catch on as the mainstream. I don't think it is at this point an issue of mere expense, although it is more expensive. I would cite lack of attention to peripheral image, poorly done disconcerting content, and lack of standardization; too many competing formats, and even too many competing goals (augmented vs virtual). I'm not rushing out to buy one. Much as the B&W folks said, "What I have is good enough".

 

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3 minutes ago, Darth Fluffy said:

Remember CGA? Proof that graphics could be crappy if you started from "Business people don't need graphics". Ah, IBM, will you ever remove your cranium  from your derriere?

It didn't take long for IBM to come out with EGA and VGA. Of course the 256 color mode of VGA was only 320x200.  Any thing passed that needed special drivers until the VESA standard started to be common.  I remeber being really excited when I had a video card the did 256 color mode in 1024x768.  The real "business people don't need graphics" video card was the mono video card.  No graphics as all, never mind "color" graphics! Of course even the IBM card was soon replaced with "Hercules Mono" or "Herc Mono".  I remember running windows 3.x in mono mode.

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1 hour ago, mlooney said:

It didn't take long for IBM to come out with EGA and VGA. Of course the 256 color mode of VGA was only 320x200.  Any thing passed that needed special drivers until the VESA standard started to be common.  I remember being really excited when I had a video card the did 256 color mode in 1024x768.  The real "business people don't need graphics" video card was the mono video card.  No graphics as all, never mind "color" graphics! Of course even the IBM card was soon replaced with "Hercules Mono" or "Herc Mono".  I remember running windows 3.x in mono mode.

 It took longer than it should have; it should have takes zero years, been available from day one. The CGA card needed a mere three additional registers to hold three additional color values to bring it up to the color standard of the day, which Apple achieved years before, and every competitor fielded (well, the ones that weren't monochrome, like Kaypro). IBM themselves did exactly that in the IBM PC Junior.

I loved EGA when it came out. Real graphics on the *&#% IBM. It didn't last long, was fairly quickly superseded by the more capable VGA. Games that are specifically EGA compatible are rare.

 The Hercules Monochrome graphics card was brilliant for what it was.Before IBM offered graphics, before color monitors were common (they were quite expensive back in the day), the Hercules card offered actual, albeit monochrome, graphics, at a resolution that would make you sad today, but was cutting edge in the early 80's.

 

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I just looked it up.  I would have sworn that the Herc Mono card had higher resolution than 720×348.

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On 4/29/2022 at 10:16 AM, mlooney said:

I sorta miss not being the right age for Sesame  Street when it started out.  I remember "The Electric Company" when It came out as being designed for my age group, but I don't really remember watching it.  Of course when I was in Germany on my first tour there was a betting pool as to what the "sponsored by the letter" letter of the day was.  Of course  in that unit there was a betting pool for damn near everything. 

On 4/29/2022 at 5:23 PM, Darth Fluffy said:

I missed all of that. I remember Capt. Kangaroo, Bozo the Clown, Gene London, Sally Starr, and Chief Halftown; the last three were Philly area hosts. Oh, yes, and Wee Willy Webber when Philly got an independent UHF mega-station. None of them were primarily educational, but could, for the most part, be counted on for having something to say about values on each show. I also watched American Bandstand with Dick Clark, because 'nothing else was on', which probably meant soaps, and why wasn't I outside, playing?

I saw a little bit of The Electric Company in reruns when I was really young, but I don't really remember anything about it (in fact, looking it up just now I realized I was attributing some of my memories of 3-2-1 Contact to The Electric Company). I did have an issue or two of the magazine as a kid, but even there pretty much all I remember is the Spider Man comic strip in it.

I also saw the PBS version of Captain Kangaroo in the mid 80s, but I didn't like it much. (I remember feeling several of the characters were too mean, to the point it made the show stressful for me. Ironically I found action shows with outright villains easier to handle.)

While I did watch Sesame Street, my favorite show up until age six or so was Mister Roger's Neighborhood. Other kids shows I was in the target audience for and enjoyed included Voltron, Transformers, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (the first English-language cartoons of each). However, I've never stopped watching shows "for kids" (I almost stopped in my teenage years, then decided to ignore societal expectations and just watch what I liked), so the number of such shows I've seen over the years is far too huge for me to even attempt to list them all.

 

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10 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

I saw a little bit of The Electric Company in reruns when I was really young, but I don't really remember anything about it (in fact, looking it up just now I realized I was attributing some of my memories of 3-2-1 Contact to The Electric Company). I did have an issue or two of the magazine as a kid, but even there pretty much all I remember is the Spider Man comic strip in it.

I also saw the PBS version of Captain Kangaroo in the mid 80s, but I didn't like it much. (I remember feeling several of the characters were too mean, to the point it made the show stressful for me. Ironically I found action shows with outright villains easier to handle.)

While I did watch Sesame Street, my favorite show up until age six or so was Mister Roger's Neighborhood. Other kids shows I was in the target audience for and enjoyed included Voltron, Transformers, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (the first English-language cartoons of each). However, I've never stopped watching shows "for kids" (I almost stopped in my teenage years, then decided to ignore societal expectations and just watch what I liked), so the number of such shows I've seen over the years is far too huge for me to even attempt to list them all.

When I was young enough to enjoy Mr. Rogers, I considered the TV to be my parents domain. When they had something to watch, I was preempted, and I don't recall them putting on content for me. By the time I was old enough to select my own shows when no one was around (I know I did by four, that's when I was watching American Bandstand.) The real goal was cartoons, and the best were Warner Brothers. Popeye was a tolerable substitute, a few were good. At that age, I really liked Hanna Barbara cartoons. Disney was generally pretty good, but only played on Disney shows. A few years later, Rocky and Bullwinkle debuted, and they were amazing. My grandmother got cable, which had New York stations, and I got a glimpse of some ancient animation; it was pretty lame.

Later, we got UHF, and Philly had a hella-powered independent station; they played a lot of kiddy anime; Astro-Boy, Kimba, Speed Racer, Marine Boy and Prince Planet. I saw quite a bit, but they had odd skewed rationale for things happening, the art was on the weak side, I wouldn't say I was a fan. If you've ever seen Kimba, you'd swear The Lion King was ripped off. There was one, The Eighth Man, about a robot crime fighter; it stood out for being serious drama, not just silly. Decades later, I learned that the backstory was essentially RoboCop.

I was not a fan of Captain Kangaroo much, but more because it had slow pacing. Every now and then it had something interesting. It aired early, and in its slot had nothing else competing that was better.

I got hooked on sitcoms very young. Also, it was still the heyday of Westerns, which I surmise I was into, because I've seen pictures of myself as a toddler wearing a cowboy outfit.

The best kids show that I've ever seen, I used to turn it on for my kids and watch with them, was Bill Nye the Science Guy. Hands down hard core educational and entertaining.

One I remember seeing occasionally as a toddler was Shari Lewis, she was still on thirty years later, and my kids watched it.

 

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On 5/2/2022 at 1:24 AM, Darth Fluffy said:

The best kids show that I've ever seen, I used to turn it on for my kids and watch with them, was Bill Nye the Science Guy. Hands down hard core educational and entertaining.

One I remember seeing occasionally as a toddler was Shari Lewis, she was still on thirty years later, and my kids watched it.

I loved Bill Nye, though by the time he was on TV I already knew most of what he was teaching; I watched it more for the humor than for what I could learn. (Then again, that was probably why most kids watched it. I've always been interested in learning, however, and have watched shows like "Nature" and "Nova" since I was a little kid, as well as various other PBS documentaries.)

I never watched much of Shari Lewis, but my younger sister loved Lambchop's Play Along.

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