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      Welcome!   03/05/2016

      Welcome, everyone, to the new 910CMX Community Forums. I'm still working on getting them running, so things may change.  If you're a 910 Comic creator and need your forum recreated, let me know and I'll get on it right away.  I'll do my best to make this new place as fun as the last one!

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6 hours ago, Darth Fluffy said:

The overall acting of pretty much everyone is more organic in TNG, it flows better, you can actually believe they live on the ship. There are people in the corridors. There are rec areas; 10 forward and the holodeck(s? - there should be several, or is it 'officers only'?).

TNG Technical Manual says that a Galaxy-class ship has twenty holodecks in total. That’s enough for every crewmember to get twelve hours per month of personal time, and groups of people could collectively pool their time for shared scenarios. TNG made extensive use of Holodeck Two in particular, so it may be that that one was reserved for senior officers.

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On 6/14/2022 at 5:02 AM, Darth Fluffy said:

Did you watch Bill Nye, the Science Guy?

I watched Mr. Wizard. Don Herbert is one of the people who inspired me to choose science as a career. It wouldn't surprise me to learn that Bill Nye watched him, too.

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10 hours ago, Darth Fluffy said:

'Active' 1985 to just into 2000 -published by Palladium books. I've seen this in my gaming store, back in the day (1980s).

I didn't know anyone that purchased it.

I had a copy of it.  Wasn't very impressed by it, as I'm not a fan of the Palladium rules.  It was just "Rifts" with the setting changed.  Never play a game of it however

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1 hour ago, Amiable Dorsai said:

I watched Mr. Wizard. Don Herbert is one of the people who inspired me to choose science as a career. It wouldn't surprise me to learn that Bill Nye watched him, too.

I credit an early interest in science fiction. Cartoons with Marvin, You Will Go to the Moon (they lied), Dr. Seuss from a kid's perspective, later actual juvenile sci fi. I also credit the space race, which I followed extensively. And books; I had a bunch of How and Why books with decent coverage of topics for that age, my dad got Popular Science and similar magazines, I liked the Time Life Science series and Nature series, which was widely available in libraries, I had a few About ... books, and several Golden Pocket Guides. Also mechanical puzzle toys as a toddler, and science kits later. I got toys that intrigued my dad. I recall winding two motors for two different kits, and yes, they worked.

OTOH, if it didn't interest him, it did not happen. I got interested in fishing, and asked him to take me, many times. He took me once, to shut me up, offered no advice, probably because he really didn't have any, and we didn't stay long at all, which if yo think about it, is not a way to fish. I suppose in his day, to be fair, he would have just done it and not bugged his dad. But he lived within an easy walk of a river, I did not.

Shows like Mr. Wizard were good when I could find them. The one I recall having access to, I don't remember the name, had a dachshund named Corpuscle, and two or three people mostly talking about science, slow paced, few demonstrations. One of the people was a woman, so props for early 'Involve girls in STEM'.

I did like Tom Swift, but I don't think it was a big motivator.

I liked stage magic, watched The Magic Land of Alakazam with Mark Wilson every week, and had some magic trick stuff, a few I got good at. I believe that got me thinking in terms of 'what is real' - there seems to be a connection between interest in stage magic and interest in science. Good stage magicians use cutting edge science to their advantage.

 

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4 hours ago, ijuin said:

TNG Technical Manual says that a Galaxy-class ship has twenty holodecks in total. That’s enough for every crewmember to get twelve hours per month of personal time, and groups of people could collectively pool their time for shared scenarios. TNG made extensive use of Holodeck Two in particular, so it may be that that one was reserved for senior officers.

20 X 2 x 30 = 1200. Only 1200 people? I recall seeing a number many years ago, I thought it was more. The ship seems city sized. Guess not.

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10 minutes ago, mlooney said:

I had a copy of it.  Wasn't very impressed by it, as I'm not a fan of the Palladium rules.  It was just "Rifts" with the setting changed.  Never play a game of it however

I've never played a Palladium game. The settings seem interesting, but lean toward 'throw in the kitchen sink'.

Rifts seems to be their most popular property, and I see little activity.

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1 hour ago, Darth Fluffy said:

The settings seem interesting, but lean toward 'throw in the kitchen sink'.

 

In the case of Rifts, they go next door to get their sink, plus a restaurant sink and what ever other sinks they can find.  They've got 80 game books and none of them are small.

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Gurps isn't really the same as Rifts, in that each setting book (or series in some cases, like Traveller) in Gurps is a stand alone book which may more may not go with any other Gurps setting books  All the Rifts books are interleaved.   But yeah, if you were take all the Gurps books plus all the Rift books you would have a weight several times that of the GM. 

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36 minutes ago, mlooney said:

Gurps isn't really the same as Rifts, in that each setting book (or series in some cases, like Traveller) in Gurps is a stand alone book which may more may not go with any other Gurps setting books  All the Rifts books are interleaved.   But yeah, if you were take all the Gurps books plus all the Rift books you would have a weight several times that of the GM. 

GURP covers some archaic and obscure literary settings.

Palladium's Turtles had some of the 'kitchen sink' thing going on. With only five or so books, they covered interstellar space and in another multidimensional travel. I'll give Palladium this, their books were dense, you got a lot of content for you dollar. Can't speak to the quality, other than previously mentioned '... it doesn't seem popular ...'. Maybe too rules heavy?

In spite of all of that, for sheer weight, does anything really come close to all the versions, settings, and supplements for D&D?

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4 hours ago, Darth Fluffy said:

I credit an early interest in science fiction.

Have Spacesuit, Will Travel by Robert Heinlein really influenced me, not just toward what are now called STEM studies, but towards valuing education in general.

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I loved Heinlein's juvies, I was a bit older when I found them, around 6th through 8th grade. Citizen of the Galaxy was good, and The Rolling Stones.

Loved Asimov's Robot stories and his science nonfiction, very accessible.

 

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4 hours ago, Darth Fluffy said:

20 X 2 x 30 = 1200. Only 1200 people? I recall seeing a number many years ago, I thought it was more. The ship seems city sized. Guess not.

A Galaxy class ship has a base crew complement of just over one thousand, but can take on additional personal if a mission requires it.

10 minutes ago, Amiable Dorsai said:

Have Spacesuit, Will Travel by Robert Heinlein really influenced me, not just toward what are now called STEM studies, but towards valuing education in general.

Heinlein was very much in favor of education for the sake of having the knowledge as opposed to simply getting degrees and certifications to qualify for a job.

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22 hours ago, Darth Fluffy said:

I am surprised you knew it was a comic first. I've never seen the comic for sale. TMNT timeline:

Comic: Published 1984 to 2014, appears to have been licensed a few times to others.

RPG: 'Active' 1985 to just into 2000 -published by Palladium books. I've seen this in my gaming store, back in the day (1980s).

I didn't know anyone that purchased it. There was a line of lead figures for it, the store carried them, and I've seen them on ebay occasionally.

Cartoon: Began in 1987, so, not long after, and then it really took off. Lots of action figures and play sets. My kids were never really into this.

Movies: Began in 1990.

Franchise: They've had many iterations of the cartoon, films, and toys. Still has a fairly strong following.

I've never gotten into them myself, (probably why my kids did not gravitate to it) but I like the basic early concept. I like Splinter. The April comic art in the original comic is more ethnic than April in the cartoon. I did not realize Casey Jones was an ally, I figured he was an antagonist.

Well, I didn't know there was a comic when I first started watching the show. However, I was enough of a fan to buy several issues of "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Magazine", which occasionally had articles about the real-life origins of TMNT. I then went looking for the original comic, and instead found Archie's cartoon inspired "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures" comic; in retrospect I'm glad that was what I found, as it wound up becoming my favorite incarnation of the franchise (it captures the mood of the cartoon with much better writing, and most of the run had really good art).

It wasn't until I started visiting comic shops in my late teens that I was finally able to find back issues of the (by then ended) original comic. I enjoyed them well enough, but they didn't resonate with me the way many other incarnations of the franchise have.

I still consider myself a TMNT fan, though unlike when I was a kid I'm no longer rushing to consume every bit of TMNT media I can.

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