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Pharaoh RutinTutin

Story Wednesday December 11, 2019

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Just now, Tom Sewell said:

Babylon 5 also has a connection with the original Star Trek: Walther Koenig (Chekov in Star Trek) played Bester, a creepy member of the PsyCorps.

And he did a great job of it too.

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6 minutes ago, Tom Sewell said:

Yup, the Ray Bradbury story. While we're on the subject of the career of Bill Mumy, he was also the redheaded kid in The Music Man.

Wiki credits Jerome Bixby who I'm not familiar with. He seems to have worked mostly in scripts, maybe it was based on a Bradbury work.

The red head kid is Ron Howard, Opie from The Andy Griffith show, and renowned now as a director. They are very close in age, and looked similar enough that they are easy to confuse. Bill Mumy seems to be in better shape today.

You want to hear something weirdly amazing? I warn you, it's a bit of an ear worm. President Kennedy's physical fitness recording for public schools, aka Chickenfat. Recognize the voice?

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3 minutes ago, Darth Fluffy said:

The red head kid is Ron Howard, Opie from The Andy Griffith show, and renowned now as a director. They are very close in age, and looked similar enough that they are easy to confuse. Bill Mumy seems to be in better shape today.

Yes, I realized that about a minute after I posted it. So I edited it, but not in time.

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On 12/11/2019 at 6:47 PM, hkmaly said:

It's also movie with lot of transformations, and list of such movies was likely quite short at that time.

I would be able to compose quite a long list of movies I saw and books I read which are not good and likely awful, but besides nostalgia, they had big value in containing topics which other stuff available to me as child lacked.

(EDIT: Assuming I would be able to remember enough to find how it was NAMED of course ...)

At which time? When it was first released in theaters? Perhaps; I wouldn't know.

In the 80s and 90s, when Dan and those Bunnies around the same age as him (such as myself) were growing up? Well maybe if you're really into transformation there wouldn't be enough, but it wasn't all that uncommon, particularly getting into the 90s. (Even just thinking of Disney animated movies, both the Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast came out during that period.)

In the 00s and 10s, when the younger Bunnies (and Ashley if we assume the "present" of the comic is in the last decade) were growing up? Not that hard to find, particularly if you broaden your search beyond movies. (Ashley canonically got into transformation largely due to reading the Ranma 1/2 manga after all.)

Still, you're right that it makes sense that The Sword in the Stone would be popular among fans of transformation. In fact, part of my surprise was that something so obvious hadn't occurred to me before - particularly as I'm a bit of a fan of transformation myself.

But then, despite some of my earliest favorite shows being about transforming machines and robots (Voltron, Transformers, Go-Bots), it was Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles that really got me interested in transformation. Since all of the transformations in that were either permanent or assumed to be permanent in-story (until they were undone at the end of the episode), for quite a while my focus was on long term transformations, the sort where the subject has to adapt to and try to accept (or at least learn to live with) a new body. (If Brother Bear had been released in when I was a child, it probably would have become my favorite Disney movie.) I don't think it was until I got into EGS that I really became interested in short-term transformations.

EDIT: Actually, thinking on it a bit more, it's probably not so much the case that TMNT got me interested in transformation so much as it made me realize how much fictional transformations could resonate with me; if I never saw TMNT something else probably would have done it for me, maybe X-Men or certain episodes of Gargoyles. However, I'm pretty sure it's because of the type of transformation that it resonated; as someone whose body image diverged from what I saw in the mirror as I grew older, I identified with characters that were changed into forms they never would have chosen with little hope of a quick fix. The transformations in The Sword in the Stone, where there was never any suggestion Arthur was in danger of needing to live as one of the animals Merlin turned him into, just weren't as relevant to me.

On 12/12/2019 at 10:18 AM, Darth Fluffy said:

I feel this way about Spaceballs. It's OK, it's funny, I like it, but it's not really great. Galaxy Quest is a much better movie, and among Mel Brooks's movies, there are better. My kids, who were introduced to it when they were young, think it's hysterical.

Interestingly, I was introduced to Spaceballs when I was young, and think it's a great movie. Admittedly, some of the humor is a little crude for my tastes, but I still consider it among the funniest movies I've seen (mind you, I haven't seen many other Mel Brooks movies, so I'm not in a position to compare it to his other works; one of these days I should probably track some of them down). I also enjoy the story for it's own sake; while a little silly I think it really does work well as a stand-alone fantasy-in-space adventure.

Galaxy Quest on the other hand I saw as an adult, and it didn't work for me. None of the jokes struck me as funny, and I didn't like the plot. (Also, I felt at the time that the story relied a bit too much on the audience knowing the basics of Star Trek; looking back I probably wasn't giving the movie, or the movie-viewing-public in general, enough credit.) Then again, it's possible I was just too into Star Trek at the time, and too sensitive about it, to be able to enjoy a parody of it.

Edited by ChronosCat

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6 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

At which time? When it was first released in theaters? Perhaps; I wouldn't know.

In the 80s and 90s, when Dan and those Bunnies around the same age as him (such as myself) were growing up? Well maybe if you're really into transformation there wouldn't be enough, but it wasn't all that uncommon, particularly getting into the 90s. (Even just thinking of Disney animated movies, both the Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast came out during that period.)

In the 00s and 10s, when the younger Bunnies (and Ashley if we assume the "present" of the comic is in the last decade) were growing up? Not that hard to find, particularly if you broaden your search beyond movies. (Ashley canonically got into transformation largely due to reading the Ranma 1/2 manga after all.)

Still, you're right that it makes sense that The Sword in the Stone would be popular among fans of transformation. In fact, part of my surprise was that something so obvious hadn't occurred to me before - particularly as I'm a bit of a fan of transformation myself.

But then, despite some of my earliest favorite shows being about transforming machines and robots (Voltron, Transformers, Go-Bots), it was Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles that really got me interested in transformation. Since all of the transformations in that were either permanent or assumed to be permanent in-story (until they were undone at the end of the episode), for quite a while my focus was on long term transformations, the sort where the subject has to adapt to and try to accept (or at least learn to live with) a new body. (If Brother Bear had been released in when I was a child, it probably would have become my favorite Disney movie.) I don't think it was until I got into EGS that I really became interested in short-term transformations.

I was specifically thinking about multiple transformations and the ratio of transformations per minute. Sure, TMNT starts with if I count correctly seven transformations, but there is basically no transformation afterwards, everyone only transformed once, at least as far as I remember. The same would be true for Little Mermaid and (considering what's onscreen) the Beauty and the Beast ... and lot and lot of others.

And the robots ... I think are something little different.

And generally, you are not likely to find stuff like Ranma 1/2 randomly. Ashley is exception and only found it due to the panda.

7 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

EDIT: Actually, thinking on it a bit more, it's probably not so much the case that TMNT got me interested in transformation so much as it made me realize how much fictional transformations could resonate with me; if I never saw TMNT something else probably would have done it for me, maybe X-Men or certain episodes of Gargoyles. However, I'm pretty sure it's because of the type of transformation that it resonated; as someone whose body image diverged from what I saw in the mirror as I grew older, I identified with characters that were changed into forms they never would have chosen with little hope of a quick fix. The transformations in The Sword in the Stone, where there was never any suggestion Arthur was in danger of needing to live as one of the animals Merlin turned him into, just weren't as relevant to me.

... now, sure, if you were more about adapting to the transformation instead of multiple short-term transformations, it will be something different.

7 hours ago, ChronosCat said:
On 12/12/2019 at 4:18 PM, Darth Fluffy said:

I feel this way about Spaceballs. It's OK, it's funny, I like it, but it's not really great. Galaxy Quest is a much better movie, and among Mel Brooks's movies, there are better. My kids, who were introduced to it when they were young, think it's hysterical.

Interestingly, I was introduced to Spaceballs when I was young, and think it's a great movie. Admittedly, some of the humor is a little crude for my tastes, but I still consider it among the funniest movies I've seen (mind you, I haven't seen many other Mel Brooks movies, so I'm not in a position to compare it to his other works; one of these days I should probably track some of them down). I also enjoy the story for it's own sake; while a little silly I think it really does work well as a stand-alone fantasy-in-space adventure.

Galaxy Quest on the other hand I saw as an adult, and it didn't work for me. None of the jokes struck me as funny, and I didn't like the plot. (Also, I felt at the time that the story relied a bit too much on the audience knowing the basics of Star Trek; looking back I probably wasn't giving the movie, or the movie-viewing-public in general, enough credit.) Then again, it's possible I was just too into Star Trek at the time, and too sensitive about it, to be able to enjoy a parody of it.

I would agree that the Galaxy Quest is relying more on knowing Star Trek. One example: target audience of Galaxy Quest will start laughing when they see the ship, because the design of the ship itself is parody of Enterprise ... but people who didn't saw Star Trek will never know.

Now about the second part ... weird. I don't think I was ever sensitive to parodies no matter how much I was into the source material.

 

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2 hours ago, hkmaly said:

I was specifically thinking about multiple transformations and the ratio of transformations per minute. Sure, TMNT starts with if I count correctly seven transformations, but there is basically no transformation afterwards, everyone only transformed once, at least as far as I remember. The same would be true for Little Mermaid and (considering what's onscreen) the Beauty and the Beast ... and lot and lot of others.

Speaking specifically of the 1987-1997 cartoon series, the first episode told about Splinter and the Turtles transformations, then the second had the transformation of Bebop and Rocksteady; I assume those are the seven you refer to. Most following seasons introduced multiple new mutants (some of which started as animals and some of which started as humans); most of these were permanent transformations as well. Along the way April, Irma, and Vernon were all mutated on multiple occasions, always being restored to normal by the end of the episode. Season nine introduced secondary mutations for the Turtles, causing them to turn into Hulk-like monsters temporarily once or twice an episode (as well as Carter, a new character with a similar type of transformation). ...Still, for all that, most episodes prior to season nine didn't have any transformations at all, so your point still stands.

(Incidentally, most other incarnations of the franchise had far fewer transformations; the only one I'm familiar with that is comparable is the 2012-2017 cartoon series.)

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9 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

Interestingly, I was introduced to Spaceballs when I was young, and think it's a great movie. Admittedly, some of the humor is a little crude for my tastes, but I still consider it among the funniest movies I've seen (mind you, I haven't seen many other Mel Brooks movies, so I'm not in a position to compare it to his other works; one of these days I should probably track some of them down). I also enjoy the story for it's own sake; while a little silly I think it really does work well as a stand-alone fantasy-in-space adventure.

Galaxy Quest on the other hand I saw as an adult, and it didn't work for me. None of the jokes struck me as funny, and I didn't like the plot. (Also, I felt at the time that the story relied a bit too much on the audience knowing the basics of Star Trek; looking back I probably wasn't giving the movie, or the movie-viewing-public in general, enough credit.) Then again, it's possible I was just too into Star Trek at the time, and too sensitive about it, to be able to enjoy a parody of it.

I saw Gilligan's Island when I was young, so "Those poor people" struck home.

High Anxiety is one of his best, but the jokes are based on old black and white movies, if you've never seen them, it will fall flat.

Young Frankenstein is great. The spoofed tropes are well know, so probably not a problem.

Blazing Saddles is good. Some of the jokes in Spaceballs are repeated from Blazing Saddles, like watching the movie they're in to get information.

Just in general, his older stuff is better than his newer stuff, and if you are interested in one, looking it up and watching what it's spoofing or remaking first gets more mileage out of his movies.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, ChronosCat said:
4 hours ago, hkmaly said:

Sure, TMNT starts with if I count correctly seven transformations, but there is basically no transformation afterwards, everyone only transformed once, at least as far as I remember. The same would be true for Little Mermaid and (considering what's onscreen) the Beauty and the Beast ... and lot and lot of others.

Speaking specifically of the 1987-1997 cartoon series, the first episode told about Splinter and the Turtles transformations, then the second had the transformation of Bebop and Rocksteady; I assume those are the seven you refer to.

Yes.

1 hour ago, ChronosCat said:

Most following seasons introduced multiple new mutants (some of which started as animals and some of which started as humans); most of these were permanent transformations as well. Along the way April, Irma, and Vernon were all mutated on multiple occasions, always being restored to normal by the end of the episode. Season nine introduced secondary mutations for the Turtles, causing them to turn into Hulk-like monsters temporarily once or twice an episode (as well as Carter, a new character with a similar type of transformation). ...Still, for all that, most episodes prior to season nine didn't have any transformations at all, so your point still stands.

I don't think 9th season was airing here.

1 hour ago, ChronosCat said:

(Incidentally, most other incarnations of the franchise had far fewer transformations; the only one I'm familiar with that is comparable is the 2012-2017 cartoon series.)

... as there any other reason why I shouldn't think I got the best one?

1 hour ago, Darth Fluffy said:
11 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

Interestingly, I was introduced to Spaceballs when I was young, and think it's a great movie. Admittedly, some of the humor is a little crude for my tastes, but I still consider it among the funniest movies I've seen (mind you, I haven't seen many other Mel Brooks movies, so I'm not in a position to compare it to his other works; one of these days I should probably track some of them down). I also enjoy the story for it's own sake; while a little silly I think it really does work well as a stand-alone fantasy-in-space adventure.

Galaxy Quest on the other hand I saw as an adult, and it didn't work for me. None of the jokes struck me as funny, and I didn't like the plot. (Also, I felt at the time that the story relied a bit too much on the audience knowing the basics of Star Trek; looking back I probably wasn't giving the movie, or the movie-viewing-public in general, enough credit.) Then again, it's possible I was just too into Star Trek at the time, and too sensitive about it, to be able to enjoy a parody of it.

I saw Gilligan's Island when I was young, so "Those poor people" struck home.

High Anxiety is one of his best, but the jokes are based on old black and white movies, if you've never seen them, it will fall flat.

Young Frankenstein is great. The spoofed tropes are well know, so probably not a problem.

Blazing Saddles is good. Some of the jokes in Spaceballs are repeated from Blazing Saddles, like watching the movie they're in to get information.

Just in general, his older stuff is better than his newer stuff, and if you are interested in one, looking it up and watching what it's spoofing or remaking first gets more mileage out of his movies.

Only in the last paragraph I realized what those movies are supposed to have in common. I think Young Frankenstein is only one I saw ...

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52 minutes ago, hkmaly said:

I don't think 9th season was airing here.

I believe we discussed this before and the conclusion was that the final seasons didn't air in your area. (Which is not surprising as from what I've heard most places outside the US only got the first few seasons.)

56 minutes ago, hkmaly said:

... as there any other reason why I shouldn't think I got the best one?

Are you asking whether the 1987 cartoon was the best incarnation of TMNT? If not, I'm not sure what you're asking.

If so... Well, obviously it's largely a matter of taste, and what you're looking for. The '87 series was what made the Turtles popular, so they clearly did something right, and I certainly have a lot of nostalgia for it; however the writing was never the greatest, and seasons three through seven had many episodes with really bad writing and art (as they focused on quantity over quality).

Personally, my favorite version of TMNT was the "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures" comics published by Arche comics and loosely based on the '87 show (but going off on it's own direction). I really liked the writing direction, and the main artist for much of its run was really good. Also, relevant to the current discussion, while it didn't have as many transformations as the cartoons, it did take more time to examine what the transformations it did have meant to those transformed, and to show how they coped.

The 2003 and 2012 cartoons were pretty good too, with  really good writing (most of the time) and consistently good art; if it weren't for nostalgia (and the 2003 cartoon's relative lack of transformations) I'd probably like them better than the '87 cartoon.

(Technically, the original "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" comic from Mirage ought to be in the running for best TMNT as well, as it was what spawned everything else; but honestly I think almost everything it did well later versions of the franchise did even better. Meanwhile, I can't comment on the current IDW comics, as I haven't read them yet.)

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12 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

I believe we discussed this before and the conclusion was that the final seasons didn't air in your area. (Which is not surprising as from what I've heard most places outside the US only got the first few seasons.)

Are you asking whether the 1987 cartoon was the best incarnation of TMNT? If not, I'm not sure what you're asking.

If so... Well, obviously it's largely a matter of taste, and what you're looking for. The '87 series was what made the Turtles popular, so they clearly did something right, and I certainly have a lot of nostalgia for it; however the writing was never the greatest, and seasons three through seven had many episodes with really bad writing and art (as they focused on quantity over quality).

Personally, my favorite version of TMNT was the "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Adventures" comics published by Arche comics and loosely based on the '87 show (but going off on it's own direction). I really liked the writing direction, and the main artist for much of its run was really good. Also, relevant to the current discussion, while it didn't have as many transformations as the cartoons, it did take more time to examine what the transformations it did have meant to those transformed, and to show how they coped.

The 2003 and 2012 cartoons were pretty good too, with  really good writing (most of the time) and consistently good art; if it weren't for nostalgia (and the 2003 cartoon's relative lack of transformations) I'd probably like them better than the '87 cartoon.

(Technically, the original "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" comic from Mirage ought to be in the running for best TMNT as well, as it was what spawned everything else; but honestly I think almost everything it did well later versions of the franchise did even better. Meanwhile, I can't comment on the current IDW comics, as I haven't read them yet.)

My first exposure to TMNT was as an RPG for sale at a games store in the early 1980s. The publisher was Dark Horse Games. I never played it, didn't know anyone that purchased it, didn't know enough about the mythos to fully appreciate it; my incorrect expectation was that it would be something like what Toon was when that product was released.

There was a line of lead miniatures to go with it. They apparently did not sell well, exacerbated by being lead, not pewter, being subject to lead rot.

It seemed like a clever enough concept, but I was surprised several years later how it exploded into the mainstream.

 

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18 hours ago, ChronosCat said:
19 hours ago, hkmaly said:

... as there any other reason why I shouldn't think I got the best one?

Are you asking whether the 1987 cartoon was the best incarnation of TMNT? If not, I'm not sure what you're asking.

If so... Well, obviously it's largely a matter of taste, and what you're looking for.

That's what I wanted to ask for. Like, we established that when looking for transformation, it's either the 1987 or the 2012.

Now, what could one be looking for which would make other season winners?

18 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

The 2003 and 2012 cartoons were pretty good too, with  really good writing (most of the time) and consistently good art; if it weren't for nostalgia (and the 2003 cartoon's relative lack of transformations) I'd probably like them better than the '87 cartoon.

... well, good writing WOULD be something to look for ...

5 hours ago, Darth Fluffy said:

There was a line of lead miniatures to go with it. They apparently did not sell well, exacerbated by being lead, not pewter, being subject to lead rot.

Whoa. Interesting. The lead rot, I mean.

 

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3 hours ago, hkmaly said:

Whoa. Interesting. The lead rot, I mean.

In the early 80s, lead was the common material for miniatures. I don't think it's used any more for this reason and because the miniatures are small enough for a curious child to swallow. Pewter has been a mainstay for years since, although now plastic is pretty much taking over.

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7 hours ago, Darth Fluffy said:

It seemed like a clever enough concept, but I was surprised several years later how it exploded into the mainstream.

It was all thanks licensing agent  Mark Freedman, who believed the TMNT would make great toys, and Playmates Toys, which agreed but wanted a TMNT cartoon to launch around the same time to help promote the toys. (Of course the team that made the show deserve some credit for creating a show kids wanted to watch.)

1 hour ago, hkmaly said:

That's what I wanted to ask for. Like, we established that when looking for transformation, it's either the 1987 or the 2012.

Now, what could one be looking for which would make other season winners?

Well, one thing I overlooked when I said that the original Mirage comic didn't do much that other versions did better is that the original comic was relatively violent. The Turtles weren't afraid to injure their enemies in battle and occasionally even kill them; the villains of course were even more violent. Most of the other incarnations of TMNT have been aimed at kids, so they couldn't get away with that. So if you're looking for Turtles that make proper use of their weapons, the Mirage comic is the best option.

Returning to cartoons, besides the good writing and art, the biggest thing going for the 2003 series is that it is the most faithful to the Mirage comic of all the adaptations (though they did have to tone down the violence, and it has plenty of story elements not in the comics). It's also the most serious of the TMNT cartoons (not counting the penultimate season, "Fast Forward"), though it does still have some humor in it.

If you like the sort of humor seen in shows like Teen Titans Go, the latest cartoon, "Rise of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" would probably be appealing - but from what little I watched it looks like that's pretty much all it has going for it (which is why I haven't bothered watching any more). (At least, I assume it's Teen Titans Go style; I haven't actually watched any of that. Whatever it is, it's not a type of humor that works for me.)

If you're looking for live action, the first movie (from 1990) is probably the best option. It has good writing, acting, etc., and the animatronic suits for the turtles are really impressive. (Secret of the Ooze isn't bad either if you don't mind silliness along the lines of stuff from the cartoon. The fourth movie, "TMNT", is also really good, but it isn't live action. I have nothing good to say about the Michael Bay Turtles movies.)

There have also been a number of TMNT video games, usually tying into whatever the current cartoon is. I'm only familiar with the ones from the 80s and 90s; most of them were pretty fun, but I wouldn't say any are in the running for "Best incarnation of TMNT". My favorites are the Arcade Game and the games it inspired (particularly "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III: The Manhattan Project" for the NES, which has better controls than the NES adaptation of the Arcade Game, and the most imaginative level design of that set of games).

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18 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

Well, one thing I overlooked when I said that the original Mirage comic didn't do much that other versions did better is that the original comic was relatively violent. The Turtles weren't afraid to injure their enemies in battle and occasionally even kill them; the villains of course were even more violent. Most of the other incarnations of TMNT have been aimed at kids, so they couldn't get away with that. So if you're looking for Turtles that make proper use of their weapons, the Mirage comic is the best option.

That's definitely good point. Show based on fighting but without violence, ehm ...

18 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

If you like the sort of humor seen in shows like Teen Titans Go, the latest cartoon, "Rise of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" would probably be appealing - but from what little I watched it looks like that's pretty much all it has going for it (which is why I haven't bothered watching any more). (At least, I assume it's Teen Titans Go style; I haven't actually watched any of that. Whatever it is, it's not a type of humor that works for me.)

I wouldn't know if it's Teen Titans Go style either ... any other way to describe it?

18 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

If you're looking for live action, the first movie (from 1990) is probably the best option. It has good writing, acting, etc., and the animatronic suits for the turtles are really impressive. (Secret of the Ooze isn't bad either if you don't mind silliness along the lines of stuff from the cartoon. The fourth movie, "TMNT", is also really good, but it isn't live action. I have nothing good to say about the Michael Bay Turtles movies.)

Live action with animatronic suits, no thanks. When main heroes are anthropomorphic turtles, I will prefer animation or CGI. But that's just me, so definitely good point.

18 hours ago, ChronosCat said:

There have also been a number of TMNT video games, usually tying into whatever the current cartoon is. I'm only familiar with the ones from the 80s and 90s; most of them were pretty fun, but I wouldn't say any are in the running for "Best incarnation of TMNT". My favorites are the Arcade Game and the games it inspired (particularly "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III: The Manhattan Project" for the NES, which has better controls than the NES adaptation of the Arcade Game, and the most imaginative level design of that set of games).

Will that work on my linux PC? :)

(Ok, it probably would, but it likely wouldn't be same without the controller ; also, it's true I used to play games like this but that was when I had more time ...)

(Also, on second though, nowadays I'm playing games more on my android phone than on computer. At least the manufacturer claims it's phone: considering I'm using them just for the games, it's more like game console for me. I'm using old dumb nokia for my phone: it feels better when holding to ear.)

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On 12/15/2019 at 6:17 PM, hkmaly said:

I wouldn't know if it's Teen Titans Go style either ... any other way to describe it?

Well, it's been over a year since I saw it, so I don't remember very well...

From what I do remember, the first episode was non-stop jokes, so much so it was amazing they managed to fit a plot into it. Many of the jokes in that episode revolved around the fact that you expect the Turtles to be heroes, but instead they're all just irresponsible party-animals (and so is April). I didn't really notice this myself, but I remember someone else reviewing the show talking about how the jokes weren't tailored to any particular character's personality; any of the Turtles could have done any of the jokes. ...All in all, it just felt really shallow; I finished the episode not caring a bit about the characters in it (and I had gone into the episode with an open mind).

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51 minutes ago, ChronosCat said:

From what I do remember, the first episode was non-stop jokes, so much so it was amazing they managed to fit a plot into it. Many of the jokes in that episode revolved around the fact that you expect the Turtles to be heroes, but instead they're all just irresponsible party-animals (and so is April). I didn't really notice this myself, but I remember someone else reviewing the show talking about how the jokes weren't tailored to any particular character's personality; any of the Turtles could have done any of the jokes. ...All in all, it just felt really shallow; I finished the episode not caring a bit about the characters in it (and I had gone into the episode with an open mind).

Hmmmm ... I think in the 1987 version Michelangelo was like that ... and yes, making all of them like it would be really overdoing it.

So, basically ... the style is little of plot, little of characters, little of technology, little of everything and jokes you would mostly be able to fit just as well into soap opera.

Similarly how there are series happening in school where the main protagonists are superheroes, monsters or magical girls ... and the problem is that it hardly matters which of those they are and what particular powers they have, because the main focus is just standard "school stuff" like dating without sex.

Or did I overdid it?

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On 12/15/2019 at 6:17 PM, hkmaly said:

Will that work on my linux PC? :)

(Ok, it probably would, but it likely wouldn't be same without the controller ; also, it's true I used to play games like this but that was when I had more time ...)

I forgot to mention: in case you were unaware, there are controllers you can use with computers (often using USB) - including ones designed to replicate the look and feel of the controllers for old video game systems (I have one like a SNES controller and one like a Genesis/Megadrive controller).

Of course, being on Linux might complicate things, and you'd need to decide for yourself if it was worth the money for the amount of time you'd be likely to spend playing...

22 minutes ago, hkmaly said:

Hmmmm ... I think in the 1987 version Michelangelo was like that ... and yes, making all of them like it would be really overdoing it.

So, basically ... the style is little of plot, little of characters, little of technology, little of everything and jokes you would mostly be able to fit just as well into soap opera.

Similarly how there are series happening in school where the main protagonists are superheroes, monsters or magical girls ... and the problem is that it hardly matters which of those they are and what particular powers they have, because the main focus is just standard "school stuff" like dating without sex.

Or did I overdid it?

Well, the fact that they are mutants matters (in that they still need to hide in the shadows), as does the fact that they have fighting skills (they do eventually get caught up in a battle with a villain and his minions, and despite the fact that the Turtles would rather just be having fun, it's clear there will be many more battles to come). But otherwise, yes.

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40 minutes ago, ChronosCat said:
On 12/16/2019 at 0:17 AM, hkmaly said:

Will that work on my linux PC? :)

(Ok, it probably would, but it likely wouldn't be same without the controller ; also, it's true I used to play games like this but that was when I had more time ...)

I forgot to mention: in case you were unaware, there are controllers you can use with computers (often using USB) - including ones designed to replicate the look and feel of the controllers for old video game systems (I have one like a SNES controller and one like a Genesis/Megadrive controller).

Of course, being on Linux might complicate things, and you'd need to decide for yourself if it was worth the money for the amount of time you'd be likely to spend playing...

I'm pretty sure it's not. Unfortunately. I would like to have more time for games, but so far there seems to be just 60 minutes in every hour instead of required 600, so ...

41 minutes ago, ChronosCat said:

Well, the fact that they are mutants matters (in that they still need to hide in the shadows)

Acne :)

42 minutes ago, ChronosCat said:

as does the fact that they have fighting skills (they do eventually get caught up in a battle with a villain and his minions, and despite the fact that the Turtles would rather just be having fun, it's clear there will be many more battles to come). But otherwise, yes.

Well, if the fights are inside the violence limits of child shows ...

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